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image: Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

By | April 1, 2016

A braided structure and some adhesive hydrogel make therapeutic microRNAs both stable and sticky.

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image: Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

Bursting Cancer’s Bubble

By | April 1, 2015

Scientists make oxygen-filled microbubbles designed to increase tumor sensitivity to radiation.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: Narrow Straits

Narrow Straits

By | July 1, 2013

Transfecting molecules into cells is as easy as one, two, squeeze.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Sticky Lithography

Sticky Lithography

By | March 1, 2013

Scotch tape and a scalpel provide a MacGyver-esque approach to microfabrication.

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image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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image: Dynamic Delivery

Dynamic Delivery

By | July 1, 2012

Microscopic sponges made entirely of RNA enable efficient gene silencing.

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image: A Brighter Beacon

A Brighter Beacon

By | April 1, 2012

A novel liquid laser set-up can detect single nucleotide mutations in a cancer gene.

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image: Delivering Silence

Delivering Silence

By | March 1, 2012

Using RNA viruses to silence genes could optimize tissue targeting while reducing toxicity.

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