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Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

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tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014 Scientist to Watch Benjamin tenOever discusses his research.

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Electric Microbe Hairs

By | May 1, 2013

USC researcher Mohamed El-Naggar demonstrates how some bacteria grow electrical wires that allow them to link up in big biological circuits.

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Blue Biotech

By | March 1, 2013

Systems biologist Lone Gram describes her approach to combing the oceans for novel compounds that may be useful in the fight against pathogens.

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Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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2011's Best and Brightest

By | January 1, 2012

In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 

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Lobster-Pot Science

By | June 13, 2011

Microbiologist Marvin Whiteley chats about teaming up with chemist and bioengineer Jason Shear in order to build tiny houses for bacteria.

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Repairing hearts

By | June 9, 2011

Paul Riley of University College London discusses his new research, published June 8th in Nature.

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Micro Farmers

By | May 1, 2011

Columbia University evolutionary ecologist Dustin Rubenstein explains just why it's so interesting and important to find slime molds that engage in a form of agriculture.

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