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image: Fuchs on the Future

Fuchs on the Future

By | May 1, 2016

Rockefeller University researcher Elaine Fuchs on being a woman in science and her contributions to the burgeoning field of reverse genetics

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Death in the Dust

Death in the Dust

By | April 1, 2016

Follow Michele Carbone as he tracks down the genetic and environmental drivers of mesothelioma and other cancers.

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image: The Importance of Plant Science

The Importance of Plant Science

By | February 1, 2016

Meet February profilee Natasha Raikel and hear her explain why studying plant genetics is crucial.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, December 4

The Scientist on The Pulse, December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Are precision gene editing technologies, such as CRISPR, ready for prime time?

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

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image: Heart Strings

Heart Strings

By | May 1, 2015

An animated primer on the harvesting, growth, and administration of cardiac cells to heart attack patients

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image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

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