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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Frogcicle

Frogcicle

By | February 1, 2013

Watch as the astounding wood frog uses cellular cryopreservation tricks to freeze, thaw, and live to croak about it.

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image: Preserving Endangered Gametes

Preserving Endangered Gametes

By | March 1, 2012

Pierre Comizzoli, a reproductive physiologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, chats about his efforts to rescue endangered species from extinction using in vitro fertilization as well as novel gamete preservation techniques.

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image: Swarming Mongolia

Swarming Mongolia

By | February 1, 2012

For the past decade and a half, a crew of about 20 entomologists, water ecologists, and other specialists converges on the shorelines of Mongolia’s lakes, rivers, and streams, just when swarms of aquatic insects do the same.

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image: Meet the Crystal Smasher

Meet the Crystal Smasher

By | July 1, 2011

Take a tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), whose ultra-powerful X-ray beam is being used to solve the structures of proteins that are notoriously hard to crystallize.

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image: Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

By | July 1, 2011

This animation illustrates optogenetics—a radical new technology for controlling brain activity with light. 

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image: Micro Farmers

Micro Farmers

By | May 1, 2011

Columbia University evolutionary ecologist Dustin Rubenstein explains just why it's so interesting and important to find slime molds that engage in a form of agriculture.

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