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image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

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image: Making Meat

Making Meat

By | September 1, 2013

This animation explains the process researchers used to make a lab-grown hamburger patty, which was served up for the first time in early August, 2013.

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image: Cancer Whisperer

Cancer Whisperer

By | July 1, 2013

Profile subject Cédric Blanpain describes his work rooting out the role of stem cells in tumors.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: 2011's Best and Brightest

2011's Best and Brightest

By | January 1, 2012

In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 

15 Comments

image: Lobster-Pot Science

Lobster-Pot Science

By | June 13, 2011

Microbiologist Marvin Whiteley chats about teaming up with chemist and bioengineer Jason Shear in order to build tiny houses for bacteria.

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image: New Blood for Gene Therapy

New Blood for Gene Therapy

By | June 13, 2011

Follow the success story of a young boy who, with the help of the Care for Rare Foundation, underwent stem cell therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

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image: One Hip Dino

One Hip Dino

By | June 13, 2011

University College London researcher Mike Taylor recounts the discovery of a new dinosaur with unusually powerful thigh muscles. Read the full story.

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image: Repairing hearts

Repairing hearts

By | June 9, 2011

Paul Riley of University College London discusses his new research, published June 8th in Nature.

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image: Micro Farmers

Micro Farmers

By | May 1, 2011

Columbia University evolutionary ecologist Dustin Rubenstein explains just why it's so interesting and important to find slime molds that engage in a form of agriculture.

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