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image: Of Frogs and Embryos

Of Frogs and Embryos

By | September 1, 2012

Associate Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, John Wallingford, makes his living using cutting-edge microscopic techniques to watch developmental events unfold in real time.

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image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

In 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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image: 2012 Bio-Art Winners

2012 Bio-Art Winners

By | May 25, 2012

Check out the 10 images that won FASEB's first annual Bio-Art competition.

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image: Spot the Moth

Spot the Moth

By | May 1, 2012

It’s a well-known story: The peppered moth’s ancestral typica phenotype is white with dark speckles. 

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image: A Whiff of TB

A Whiff of TB

By | March 1, 2012

Chemical ecologist Max Suckling at the Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., and summer student Rachael Sagar use Pavlovian conditioning to train bees to stick out their tongues, or proboscises, at the scent of odors produced by tuberculosis-causing bacteria.

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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

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image: Nari's Shark Bite

Nari's Shark Bite

By | December 1, 2011

In February 2009, a bottlenose dolphin named Nari swam up to the Tangalooma Wild Dolphin Resort on Moreton Island off Australia’s Queensland. 

3 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

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image: One-Eyed Shark

One-Eyed Shark

By | October 19, 2011

This is not an ancient one-eyed species, but an animal suffering from a rare congenital condition known as cyclopia, which has been documented in a variety of species, including humans. 

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