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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

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image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: The View From Above

The View From Above

By | February 1, 2012

Satellite imagery is giving biologists a whole new perspective on the phenomena they study.

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image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 

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image: Nari's Shark Bite

Nari's Shark Bite

By | December 1, 2011

In February 2009, a bottlenose dolphin named Nari swam up to the Tangalooma Wild Dolphin Resort on Moreton Island off Australia’s Queensland. 

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image: One-Eyed Shark

One-Eyed Shark

By | October 19, 2011

This is not an ancient one-eyed species, but an animal suffering from a rare congenital condition known as cyclopia, which has been documented in a variety of species, including humans. 

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image: Newly Discovered Species

Newly Discovered Species

By | October 1, 2011

Life on Earth is mind-bogglingly diverse with estimates of the number of existing species in the tens of millions. Over the last 4 billion years, many species have gone extinct; and because of the actions of humans, many existing species are now endangered.

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Saving Rwanda's Gorillas

By | October 1, 2011

In late June 2009, a small group of mountain gorillas in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park began to fall ill. One by one, 11 of the dozen apes started exhibiting severe respiratory problems. 

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image: Bug Fest 2011

Bug Fest 2011

By | August 25, 2011

Earlier this month (August 13-14) thousands of children and bug-loving adults descended on the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, where all manner of insect—dead, alive, and deep fried—were on display to be looked at, touched and, yes...eaten.

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image: Battling Malaria in Africa

Battling Malaria in Africa

By | August 1, 2011

When general practitioner John Lusingu returned to his native Tanzania to do research on malaria, he was met with a total lack of science infrastructure. 

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