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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

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image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

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image: Early Bird Plumage

Early Bird Plumage

By | September 15, 2011

After rummaging through thousands of amber inclusions housed at the University of Alberta and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Canada, researchers discovered 11 amber encased-feather fossils that provide the most detailed picture yet of early feather evolution.

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image: Repainting Ancient Birds

Repainting Ancient Birds

By | July 1, 2011

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.

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