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image: Best in Industry, 2012

Best in Industry, 2012

By | June 1, 2012

Whether working for a pharmaceutical giant or a biotech start-up with a unique vision, researchers who responded to this year’s Best Places to Work in Industry survey are translating society’s most pressing scientific needs into a new generation of drugs, research tools, and cutting-edge innovations.


image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

InĀ 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es


image: Best Places for Postdocs, 2012

Best Places for Postdocs, 2012

By | April 1, 2012

Postdocs at this year’s top-ranked institutions get to tackle human health and disease from every angle. 


image: A Whiff of TB

A Whiff of TB

By | March 1, 2012

Chemical ecologist Max Suckling at the Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., and summer student Rachael Sagar use Pavlovian conditioning to train bees to stick out their tongues, or proboscises, at the scent of odors produced by tuberculosis-causing bacteria.


image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.


image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 


image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 


image: Nari's Shark Bite

Nari's Shark Bite

By | December 1, 2011

In February 2009, a bottlenose dolphin named Nari swam up to the Tangalooma Wild Dolphin Resort on Moreton Island off Australia’s Queensland. 


image: One-Eyed Shark

One-Eyed Shark

By | October 19, 2011

This is not an ancient one-eyed species, but an animal suffering from a rare congenital condition known as cyclopia, which has been documented in a variety of species, including humans. 


Saving Rwanda's Gorillas

By | October 1, 2011

In late June 2009, a small group of mountain gorillas in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park began to fall ill. One by one, 11 of the dozen apes started exhibiting severe respiratory problems. 



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