Infographics

» cancer, neurodegeneration and biochemistry

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image: Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

By | April 1, 2017

An experimental technique removes T cells that aid in vitro tumor growth.

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image: Infographic: Inside Melanoma Invasion

Infographic: Inside Melanoma Invasion

By | April 1, 2017

See what cytokine activity and cellular starvation have to do with cancer metastasis.

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image: Infographic: Mechanisms of Resistance

Infographic: Mechanisms of Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Cancers appear to be able to evolve resistance to many of the therapies doctors have tried.

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image: Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

By | April 1, 2017

Neoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Metabolic Reprogramming

Metabolic Reprogramming

By | April 1, 2016

How cancer cells fuel their rapid growth

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image: Under Pressure

Under Pressure

By | April 1, 2016

The causes and consequences of physical forces in the tumor microenvironment

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image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

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image: Ubiquitin basics

Ubiquitin basics

By | July 1, 2012

Despite its discovery as a protein that seems to show up everywhere, at least in eukaryotic cells, researchers are only beginning to scratch the surface of all of the cellular functions involving ubiquitin. 

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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

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