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image: Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

By | February 1, 2017

Expensive clinical trials and few drug approvals can drive up drug prices for consumers.

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image: Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

By | January 1, 2017

Novel uses for existing and failed drugs may save companies time and money in bringing new therapeutics to market.

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image: Delivering New Genes

Delivering New Genes

By | June 1, 2012

Gene therapies typically involve the introduction of genetic material into target cells to replace or supplement an existing, usually dysfunctional, gene. 

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image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

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image: How the Pediatric Laws Work

How the Pediatric Laws Work

By | March 1, 2012

The Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) of 2003 requires that companies developing new drugs that could be used to treat a condition in children perform clinical trials in kids before winning FDA approval. 

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image: Calcium and the Pancreas

Calcium and the Pancreas

By | February 1, 2012

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. 

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image: Lost in Space

Lost in Space

By | September 1, 2011

Looking for a more realistic way to study memory, we turned to place cells­­—­a network of cells that record a rat’s memory of an environment. 

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image: Molecular Learning

Molecular Learning

By | September 1, 2011

Long-term potentiation (LTP), discovered in the 1970s, was later shown to be the molecular basis of memory. 

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image: The Seat of Memory

The Seat of Memory

By | September 1, 2011

Early on, researchers had learned that the hippocampus was the structure in the brain where long-term memories were created and stored, but it was not known whether the different cell types within this structure might be more or less susceptible to the aging process.

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image: The Cytokine Cycle

The Cytokine Cycle

By | September 1, 2011

The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.

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