Infographics

» biochemistry, cancer and drug development

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image: Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

By | February 1, 2017

Expensive clinical trials and few drug approvals can drive up drug prices for consumers.

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image: Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

Infographic: Repurposing Strategies

By | January 1, 2017

Novel uses for existing and failed drugs may save companies time and money in bringing new therapeutics to market.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Metabolic Reprogramming

Metabolic Reprogramming

By | April 1, 2016

How cancer cells fuel their rapid growth

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image: Under Pressure

Under Pressure

By | April 1, 2016

The causes and consequences of physical forces in the tumor microenvironment

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image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

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image: Ubiquitin basics

Ubiquitin basics

By | July 1, 2012

Despite its discovery as a protein that seems to show up everywhere, at least in eukaryotic cells, researchers are only beginning to scratch the surface of all of the cellular functions involving ubiquitin. 

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image: Delivering New Genes

Delivering New Genes

By | June 1, 2012

Gene therapies typically involve the introduction of genetic material into target cells to replace or supplement an existing, usually dysfunctional, gene. 

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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

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image: Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

By | May 1, 2012

A transition-state mimic has the power to bind an enzyme at its tipping point as strongly as any available inhibitor and more strongly than most, preventing enzymatic activity. 

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