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» cancer and immunology

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Metabolic Reprogramming

Metabolic Reprogramming

By | April 1, 2016

How cancer cells fuel their rapid growth

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image: Under Pressure

Under Pressure

By | April 1, 2016

The causes and consequences of physical forces in the tumor microenvironment

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.

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image: Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

By | December 12, 2012

Fat cells behave differently in obese individuals, causing inflammation and insulin resitance.

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image: Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

By | December 6, 2012

Adipose tissue plays an immune role in individuals of normal wieght.

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image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

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