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image: Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

By and | December 1, 2016

Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By and | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

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image: Outbreak Observatory

Outbreak Observatory

By | July 1, 2015

Increasingly precise remote-sensing data are helping researchers monitor and predict cases of infectious disease.

1 Comment

image: Hidden Menace

Hidden Menace

By , , and | May 1, 2015

Curing HIV means finding and eradicating viruses still lurking in the shadows.

3 Comments

image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

3 Comments

image: Factoring in Face Time

Factoring in Face Time

By | June 1, 2013

How the study of human social interactions is helping researchers understand the spread of diseases like influenza and HIV

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image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

4 Comments

image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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