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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By and | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.


image: Viral Soldiers

Viral Soldiers

By | January 1, 2016

Phage therapy to combat bacterial infections is garnering attention for the second time in 100 years, but solid clinical support for its widespread use is still lacking.


image: Outbreak Observatory

Outbreak Observatory

By | July 1, 2015

Increasingly precise remote-sensing data are helping researchers monitor and predict cases of infectious disease.

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image: Hidden Menace

Hidden Menace

By , and | May 1, 2015

Curing HIV means finding and eradicating viruses still lurking in the shadows.


image: My Mighty Mouse

My Mighty Mouse

By | April 1, 2015

Personal drug regimens based on xenograft mice harboring a single patient’s tumor still need to prove their true utility in medicine.

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image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  


image: Nanomedicine


By , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.


image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer


image: Pain and Progress

Pain and Progress

By | February 1, 2014

Is it possible to make a nonaddictive opioid painkiller?

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