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image: Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

By | May 10, 2017

Fossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.

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image: Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells

Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells

By | April 11, 2017

These fossilized red blood cells (right), found in an ancient, blood-engorged Amblyomma tick (left), likely belonged to primates.

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image: Image of the Day: Ancient Worm

Image of the Day: Ancient Worm

By | April 10, 2017

Unlike related species, Ovatiovermis cribratus, a lobopodian from the Cambrian period, did not have a hard, protective shell.

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image: Image of the Day: Age-Old Algae

Image of the Day: Age-Old Algae

By | March 15, 2017

This 1.6 billion-year-old fossil, which resembles red algae, is the oldest plant-like fossil ever found.

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image: Image of the Day: Primordial Plants

Image of the Day: Primordial Plants

By | March 9, 2017

This ancient relative of the Ginkgo biloba (Umaltolepis mongoliensis) dates back 100 million years, to the early Cretaceous Period.

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image: Image of the Day: New Kid on the Block

Image of the Day: New Kid on the Block

By | March 6, 2017

Ancient skulls discovered in China may belong to a new hominid species that possessed both modern human and Neanderthal characteristics.

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image: Image of the Day: Toothy Slugs

Image of the Day: Toothy Slugs

By | February 7, 2017

The 480–million-year old Calvapilosa kroegerii was a spiny slug with a tongue lined with hundreds of tiny teeth.

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Otters

Image of the Day: Giant Otters

By | January 24, 2017

Paleontologists uncover a nearly complete cranium of Siamogale melilutra, a 6.24 million-year-old otter species that was as large as some modern wolf species.

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