Image of the Day

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Sigh Cells

Image of the Day: Sigh Cells

By | February 10, 2016

Two hundred fluorescently labeled neurons on either side of a mouse’s brainstem are responsible for the sighing reflex.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Fringe Fluorescence

Image of the Day: Fringe Fluorescence

By | February 9, 2016

Closely related species of hydroids can be distinguished by their patterns of fluorescence (scale bar 0.5 mm).

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Pollen Power

Image of the Day: Pollen Power

By | February 8, 2016

Scientists are investigating the use of pollen grains, shown here in a colored electron micrograph, as carbon electrodes in lithium-ion batteries.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: A Beetle’s Embrace

Image of the Day: A Beetle’s Embrace

By | February 5, 2016

Male diving beetles in the Dytiscus genus have suction cups on their legs to help them latch onto females during mating.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Tiny Tree-Dweller

Image of the Day: Tiny Tree-Dweller

By | February 4, 2016

The emerald-eyed tree frog (Kurixalus berylliniris), found in the broadleaf forests of Taiwan, is one of two new frog species described this week.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Spotty Skin

Image of the Day: Spotty Skin

By | February 3, 2016

Pigment-containing cells called chromatophores allow squid to change their skin color rapidly to blend into their environments and communicate.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Raking It In

Image of the Day: Raking It In

By | February 2, 2016

Barnacles use these appendages, imaged here using confocal microscopy, to sweep passing plankton into their shells.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Gone Fishing

Image of the Day: Gone Fishing

By | February 1, 2016

A Bryde's whale, having just gulped a mouthful of sardines, swims through a feeding frenzy off the coast of South Africa.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Taste Tubes

Image of the Day: Taste Tubes

By | January 29, 2016

The blowfly (Calliphora vomitoria) uses its mouthparts—known as pseudo trachea—to suck up liquefied food.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Lickety-Split

Image of the Day: Lickety-Split

By | January 28, 2016

The cells in this cross section of a poplar tree have been genetically modified to divide more quickly.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  2. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  3. Circadian Clock and Aging
    Daily News Circadian Clock and Aging

    Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

  4. Biologist Resigns Amid Sexual Misconduct Probe
Advertisement
INTEGRA
INTEGRA
Advertisement
Life Technologies