Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Flying in Love

Image of the Day: Flying in Love

By | February 15, 2017

Bottle flies (Lucilia sericata) recognize potential mates by capturing the flashes of light that reflect off others' wings.

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image: Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

By | February 14, 2017

Long-lived stem cells are activated by ovarian hormones to help grow mammary glands during pregnancy.

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image: Image of the Day: Gandalf’s Hat

Image of the Day: Gandalf’s Hat

By | February 13, 2017

A new species of amoeba, Arcella gandalfi, is covered in a shell that resembles a wizard’s hat.

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image: Image of the Day: Transformers

Image of the Day: Transformers

By | February 10, 2017

These facial muscle cells were genetically reprogrammed into beating heart cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Faking it

Image of the Day: Faking it

By | February 9, 2017

Some female lampreys mate with multiple males, without releasing any eggs.

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image: Image of the Day: New Beginnings

Image of the Day: New Beginnings

By | February 8, 2017

Water-dwelling hydras may use the structural memory in their cytoskeletons to regenerate after being torn apart. 

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image: Image of the Day: Toothy Slugs

Image of the Day: Toothy Slugs

By | February 7, 2017

The 480–million-year old Calvapilosa kroegerii was a spiny slug with a tongue lined with hundreds of tiny teeth.

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image: Image of the Day: Power Plants

Image of the Day: Power Plants

By | February 6, 2017

Duckweeds, tiny aquatic plants, multiply rapidly in water without cultivation and can serve as a source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

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image: Image of the Day: Bat Bot

Image of the Day: Bat Bot

By | February 3, 2017

Scientists build a robot with flexible, bat-like wings that can mimic the flight patterns of live bats.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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