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Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Growth Barrier

Image of the Day: Growth Barrier

By | January 23, 2015

A drop in sea level caused the southern Great Barrier Reef to slow its growth 2,000 years ago.

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image: Image of the Day: Whale Shark Shadow

Image of the Day: Whale Shark Shadow

By | January 22, 2015

Whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean, often attract fellow travelers like tuna.

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image: Image of the Day: Fluorescent Femur

Image of the Day: Fluorescent Femur

By | January 21, 2015

A newly identified bone stem cell (red) shown inside a mouse femur appears to be important in skeletal development.

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image: Image of the Day: Bacterial Artists

Image of the Day: Bacterial Artists

By | January 20, 2015

Hoopoe birds (Upupa epops) coat their eggs in a bacterial secretion that protects the embryos from infection.

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image: Image of the Day: Bumblebee and Borage

Image of the Day: Bumblebee and Borage

By | January 19, 2015

Bright borage flowers attract bees and are thus often planted by gardeners to attract the insects to pollinate their plots.

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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Muscle

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Muscle

By | January 16, 2015

For the first time, researchers have grown human muscle tissue that can contract in response to electricity and pharmaceuticals.

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image: Image of the Day: Swift Snake

Image of the Day: Swift Snake

By | January 15, 2015

A long body and low-friction skin help the Mojave Desert-dwelling shovel-nosed snake maneuver quickly through the sand, X-ray videos reveal.

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image: Image of the Day: Resourceful Algae

Image of the Day: Resourceful Algae

By | January 14, 2015

Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) can tap hidden pools of nitrogen and phosphorus in lakes, spurring their own growth and worsening the environment for other organisms.

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image: Image of the Day: Budding Bones

Image of the Day: Budding Bones

By | January 13, 2015

Osteoclasts (shown in red) forge a path for red blood cells (yellow) through the cartilage of a young mouse femur as it develops.

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image: Image of the Day: Varied Venom

Image of the Day: Varied Venom

By | January 12, 2015

The components of venom extracted from eastern diamondback rattlesnakes (pictured) differ depending on geographic location, while eastern coral snakes produce the same toxic cocktail across their range.

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