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Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Cleared Elasmobranch

Image of the Day: Cleared Elasmobranch

By | February 10, 2014

A juvenile butterfly ray (Gymnura crebripunctata) with cartilaginous elements in blue and mineralized tissue in crimson

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image: Image of the Day: Young Trematode

Image of the Day: Young Trematode

By | February 7, 2014

A larva of the parasite that causes intestinal schistosomiasis (Schistosoma mansoni) with nuclei in magenta, musculature in blue, and components of the nervous system in gold

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image: Image of the Day: Plant Hair

Image of the Day: Plant Hair

By | February 6, 2014

This trichome or hair on an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf is made of a single epidermal cell.

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image: Image of the Day: Fruit Fly Eye

Image of the Day: Fruit Fly Eye

By | February 5, 2014

The bristles between the ommatidia of the Drosophila compound eye are believed to protect the eye's surface.

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image: Image of the Day: Sea Angel

Image of the Day: Sea Angel

By | February 4, 2014

This marine mollusk (Clione limacina) uses its wing-like appendages to swim.

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image: Image of the Day: Bacterial Infection

Image of the Day: Bacterial Infection

By | February 3, 2014

A mouse macrophage rapidly engulfs Mycobacterium bovis.

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image: Image of the Day: Young Cnidarian

Image of the Day: Young Cnidarian

By | January 31, 2014

A jellyfish embryo (Clytia hemisphaerica) with cell boundaries labeled in red, nuclei in blue, and cilia in green

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image: Image of the Day: Carnivorous Insect

Image of the Day: Carnivorous Insect

By | January 30, 2014

The festive tiger beetle (Cicindela scutellaris) grabs small invertebrate prey with pincers.

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image: Image of the Day: Abnormal Tissue

Image of the Day: Abnormal Tissue

By | January 29, 2014

Goblet cells (blue) in a precancerous lesion in the human stomach

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Chromosomes

Image of the Day: Giant Chromosomes

By | January 28, 2014

Drosophila polytene chromosomes are formed by repeated rounds of DNA replication without cell division.

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