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Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Bacterial Infection

Image of the Day: Bacterial Infection

By | February 3, 2014

A mouse macrophage rapidly engulfs Mycobacterium bovis.

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image: Image of the Day: Young Cnidarian

Image of the Day: Young Cnidarian

By | January 31, 2014

A jellyfish embryo (Clytia hemisphaerica) with cell boundaries labeled in red, nuclei in blue, and cilia in green

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image: Image of the Day: Carnivorous Insect

Image of the Day: Carnivorous Insect

By | January 30, 2014

The festive tiger beetle (Cicindela scutellaris) grabs small invertebrate prey with pincers.

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image: Image of the Day: Abnormal Tissue

Image of the Day: Abnormal Tissue

By | January 29, 2014

Goblet cells (blue) in a precancerous lesion in the human stomach

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Chromosomes

Image of the Day: Giant Chromosomes

By | January 28, 2014

Drosophila polytene chromosomes are formed by repeated rounds of DNA replication without cell division.

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image: Image of the Day: Shielded Microbe

Image of the Day: Shielded Microbe

By | January 27, 2014

This 8-micron-wide algal species (Gephyrocapsa oceanica) is covered in protective calcium carbonate plates.

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawler

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawler

By | January 24, 2014

A parasitic nematode (Onchocerca volvulus) emerges from the antenna of a black fly (Simulium yahense).

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image: Image of the Day: Camouflaged Killer

Image of the Day: Camouflaged Killer

By | January 23, 2014

This crab spider (Thomisus onustus) disguises itself on a yellow flower in order to capture its bee prey.

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image: Image of the Day: Telling Fluorescence

Image of the Day: Telling Fluorescence

By | January 22, 2014

Differentiating mouse myoblast cells express a muscle-specific microRNA (green) and mRNA (red).

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image: Image of the Day: Harmless Fly

Image of the Day: Harmless Fly

By | January 21, 2014

The genitalia of this male scorpionfly (Panorpa communis) resemble a scorpion's stinger, but are used for holding on to the female during mating, not for stinging.

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