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Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Living Body Art

Image of the Day: Living Body Art

By | February 27, 2013

The flatworm Convolutriloba longifissura looks green in some sections because symbiotic algae dwell in its skin.

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image: Image of the Day: Intestinal Ingress

Image of the Day: Intestinal Ingress

By | February 26, 2013

The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (green) invades the body through the tips of the intestine's villi (red), which constantly shed cells, exposing a protein the bacterium exploits to gain entry.

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image: Image of the Day: Unwitting Host

Image of the Day: Unwitting Host

By | February 25, 2013

This disease-causing bacterium, Legionella pneumofila (green), may look like it's about to get eaten, but it resists being digested and thrives within the amoeba (orange).

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image: Image of the Day: Head Start

Image of the Day: Head Start

By | February 22, 2013

The starlet sea anemone has no brain, but the same genes that determine the head's location in humans are expressed on its lower end (left), opposite its mouth and tentacles.

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image: Image of the Day: Pirouetting Parasites

Image of the Day: Pirouetting Parasites

By | February 21, 2013

Toxoplasma gondii, parasitic protozoa that can cause problems during pregnancy, have been modified to glow so scientists can trace their paths as they loop and spiral around a petri dish.

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image: Image of the Day: Brain Wiring

Image of the Day: Brain Wiring

By | February 20, 2013

Neural pathways form a mesh, with yellow representing language and connecting the frontal lobe on the left to the temporal lobe on the right, and the purple curlicue representing Broca's area, which coordinates speech.

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image: Image of the Day: Plankton Net

Image of the Day: Plankton Net

By | February 19, 2013

This amphipod uses feathery bristles on its appendages to catch microscopic organisms for its next meal.

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image: Image of the Day: Downward Pull

Image of the Day: Downward Pull

By | February 15, 2013

Plants' actin skeletons (green) and plastids (red) help them sense and respond to gravity.

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image: Image of the Day: Fossilized Flower

Image of the Day: Fossilized Flower

By | February 15, 2013

A scanning electron micrograph of an acacia flower preserved in Australia before the Ice Age.

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image: Image of the Day: Fixing a Broken Ticker

Image of the Day: Fixing a Broken Ticker

By | February 14, 2013

A heart with a hole in it is repaired using a patch from a cow's pericardium, the membrane that encloses the muscular organ.

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