Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Agar Art

Image of the Day: Agar Art

By | October 9, 2015

A cell grown from red Serratia meets a yellow Nesterenkonia cell via tendrils of orange Deinococcus and Sphingomonas.

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image: Image of the Day: Antsy Feet

Image of the Day: Antsy Feet

By | October 8, 2015

The fluid trail (blue) left by an ant may act as a lubricant, helping the insect lift its adhesive feet while walking.

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image: Image of the Day: Shiny Metamorphosis

Image of the Day: Shiny Metamorphosis

By | October 7, 2015

This progression depicts the Australian crow butterfly (Euploea core) from caterpillar to chrysalis after 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and upon emergence.

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image: Image of the Day: Liver Lipids

Image of the Day: Liver Lipids

By | October 6, 2015

This micrograph shows liver cells (red) infiltrated by inflamed adipose tissue (white) and crisscrossing fibrotic strands (blue).

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image: Image of the Day: Snake Embryo

Image of the Day: Snake Embryo

By | October 5, 2015

In corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) embyros like this one, genes once associated exclusively with limb development are now known to play roles in developing external genitalia.

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image: Image of the Day: Fossil Fish

Image of the Day: Fossil Fish

By | October 2, 2015

This middle Eocene sunfish (Priscacara) was collected from Wyoming in 1984.

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image: Image of the Day: Small Shell

Image of the Day: Small Shell

By | October 1, 2015

This “microsnail” (Angustopila dominikae), with its 0.86 mm shell height, is one of the smallest land snails ever recorded.

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image: Image of the Day: Rare Bird

Image of the Day: Rare Bird

By | September 30, 2015

The elusive moustached kingfisher (Actenoides bougainvillei excelsus) was photographed for the first time earlier this month by a team of scientists working in the Solomon Islands.

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image: Image of the Day: Follicle Molecules

Image of the Day: Follicle Molecules

By | September 29, 2015

In the mouse tail, claudin proteins (green) in the hair follicle help bind skin cells together, assisted by keratins (blue) and cadherins (red).

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image: Image of the Day: Sweet Flight

Image of the Day: Sweet Flight

By | September 28, 2015

Orange nectar bats (Lonchophylla robusta) use their grooved tongues to pump nectar directly into their mouths while hovering.

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