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Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 9, 2012

A fluorescence micrograph of young sporangia, the sacs in which spores are formed, of the slime mold, Arcyria stipata.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 8, 2012

The male genitalia of a newly described species of freshwater fish (Gambusia quadruncus) comes equipped with four hooks, which come in handy when hapless females try to avoid mating.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 7, 2012

The eye of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) has a uniform, crystal-like structure, imaged here using two overlapping confocal image stacks.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 6, 2012

Schools of fish effectively vote with their fins on which direction to turn next.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 5, 2012

Cells infected with vaccinia virus (green) lose their cell-cell contacts and disrupt cell layers.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 2, 2012

Typhochlaena costae, shown here, is one of nine new tree-climbing tarantulas discovered in Brazil, which tend to have longer legs and thinner bodies than their ground-dwelling cousins. 

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | November 1, 2012

A human bone cancer cell shows off its actin filaments (purple), mitochondria (yellow), and DNA (blue).

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 31, 2012

In addition to attacking their prey in the pitch dark sky, vampire bats of Central and South America are the only bats that can run on land, with top speeds at nearly 5 mph.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 30, 2012

The tongue of a Cricket (Gryllus campestris), captured by darkfield and Rheinberg illumination

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 29, 2012

The Psyche (Leptosia nina) butterfly, shown here as a mating pair, is a weak flyer, making erratic movements as it bobs across the grass and rarely leaving ground level.

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