Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Reef Feeders

Image of the Day: Reef Feeders

By | August 25, 2016

Sea anemones feed by capturing prey in their fleshy feelers.

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image: Image of the Day: Actin Architecture

Image of the Day: Actin Architecture

By | August 24, 2016

Confocal microscopy helps researchers produce sharp images of 3-D structures, like these stained actin filaments in a cancer cell.

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image: Image of the Day: Vigilant Sleeper

Image of the Day: Vigilant Sleeper

By | August 23, 2016

Eastern pygmy possums (Cercartetus nanus) can sense potential threats even when they're asleep, scientists show.

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image: Image of the Day: Parental Prep

Image of the Day: Parental Prep

By | August 22, 2016

Zebra finches seem to help prepare their unborn chicks for a warmer climate by singing them a particular song, according to a study.

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image: Image of the Day: Golden Eyes

Image of the Day: Golden Eyes

By | August 19, 2016

Compound eyes provide insects such as this robber fly with large fields of vision.

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image: Image of the Day: Cancer Up Close

Image of the Day: Cancer Up Close

By | August 18, 2016

HER2 testing can help researchers detect breast cancer cells (pictured) early on.

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image: Image of the Day: Ancient River Dolphins

Image of the Day: Ancient River Dolphins

By | August 17, 2016

This linocut print by researcher-artist Alexandra Boersma depicts an extinct river dolphin species she and her colleagues describe today in PeerJ.  

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image: Image of the Day: Odd Couple

Image of the Day: Odd Couple

By | August 16, 2016

A rescued owl named Napolean takes shelter with Ingo, a German Shepherd. The pair live with their photographer owner in Germany.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Orienteering

Image of the Day: Cell Orienteering

By | August 15, 2016

Epithelial cells in the sea squirt embryo have invaginations (indicated by the arrows) that appear to align their centrosomes (blue and red dots), keeping the cells oriented for their next division.

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image: Image of the Day: Drop It Like It’s Jaws

Image of the Day: Drop It Like It’s Jaws

By | August 12, 2016

To capture prey, the slow swimming, deep sea goblin shark (Mitsukurina owstoni) can transition from unprotruded jaws (top) to fully protruded jaws (bottom) in about 300 milliseconds—a tactic scientists call “slingshot feeding.”

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