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Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day: Tough Helmet

Image of the Day: Tough Helmet

By | April 28, 2014

The treehopper, Hemikyptha marginata, is native to Brazil. Its sharp pronotum makes it hard for predators to eat it.

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image: Image of the Day: Bell of the Ball

Image of the Day: Bell of the Ball

By | April 25, 2014

Close up of a sea nettle jelly's bell

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image: Image of the Day: Sticky Situation

Image of the Day: Sticky Situation

By | April 24, 2014

Stalks on a sundew plant's leaf glisten with sticky secretions. They trap unwary insects for the carnivorous plant.

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image: Image of the Day: Microscopic Marauder

Image of the Day: Microscopic Marauder

By | April 23, 2014

Lace wing bugs (family Tingidae) are common pests of a variety of plants, feeding on leaf sap.

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image: Image of the Day: Expanding Embryo

Image of the Day: Expanding Embryo

By | April 22, 2014

Nuclei of proliferating cells shine blue in this quail embryo.

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image: Image of the Day: Caught Red-Handed

Image of the Day: Caught Red-Handed

By | April 21, 2014

The red palm mite (Raoiella indica) is a pest of several species of palm in the Middle East and Southeast Asia and is now invading the Caribbean.

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image: Image of the Day: Coral Colonists

Image of the Day: Coral Colonists

By | April 18, 2014

Acropora coral on World War II wreckage in Chuuk Lagoon in the Federated States of Micronesia

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image: Image of the Day: Tenacious Larvae

Image of the Day: Tenacious Larvae

By | April 17, 2014

The suckers on the abdomens of larvael net-winged midges (Diptera Blephariceridae) help them cling to rocks in the fast flowing rivers where they live.

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image: Image of the Day: Solitary Snacker

Image of the Day: Solitary Snacker

By | April 16, 2014

Unlike its infamous relatives, the egyptian locust (Anacridium aegyptium) does not swarm and is harmless to crops.

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image: Image of the Day: Deadly Fan Dance

Image of the Day: Deadly Fan Dance

By | April 15, 2014

Spores released from the fan-shaped fruiting body of the Moniliophthora perniciosa mushroom can infect cacao trees and destroy their pods.

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