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image: Opinion: After We March

Opinion: After We March

By | March 16, 2017

How to become—and stay—involved in science policy 

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Sometimes, Scientists Must March

Opinion: Sometimes, Scientists Must March

By , , and | February 13, 2017

Lessons learned from the “Death of Evidence” demonstration in Canada

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Toot Your Horn

Opinion: Toot Your Horn

By | October 6, 2016

Why (and how) scientists should advocate for their research with journalists and policymakers

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

By | March 23, 2015

Online brain-training is gaining popularity, but so far little evidence exists to support claims of improved cognition.

5 Comments

image: Opinion: How Postdocs Can Participate

Opinion: How Postdocs Can Participate

By | September 18, 2014

Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers should be taking part in discussions on the future of biomedical research.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: The Pitfalls of Uncertainty

Opinion: The Pitfalls of Uncertainty

By | April 14, 2014

How to successfully inform policy when scientific evidence is not plainly evident.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Researching the Researchers

Opinion: Researching the Researchers

By | November 25, 2013

The biomedical research community is due for some self-reflection.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Who We Work For

Opinion: Who We Work For

By | November 5, 2013

On winning hearts, minds, and votes for science

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Sexual Dysfunction Matters

Opinion: Sexual Dysfunction Matters

By | August 19, 2013

Desire and arousal disorders require the biopharmaceutical industry’s attention.

7 Comments

image: Opinion: On Living Longer

Opinion: On Living Longer

By | June 24, 2013

Memory loss in healthy older adults is on the rise, as are preventive treatments—but there is little evidence that these remedies are effective.

2 Comments

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