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image: Opinion: Toot Your Horn

Opinion: Toot Your Horn

By | October 6, 2016

Why (and how) scientists should advocate for their research with journalists and policymakers

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A patent dispute over CRISPR highlights the need for scientists to agree on IP ownership early.

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image: Two-Way Traffic

Two-Way Traffic

By | April 1, 2016

In mice, malignant cells genetically modified to express an anticancer cytokine home in on tumors and reduce their growth.

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image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.

3 Comments

image: Funding Research in Africa

Funding Research in Africa

By | January 1, 2015

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in West Africa is drawing more money to study the virus, but what about funding for African science in general?

2 Comments

image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: Banking on iPSCs

Banking on iPSCs

By | September 1, 2014

A flurry of induced pluripotent stem cell banks are coming online, but they face significant business challenges.

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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By | May 1, 2014

Selected Images of the Day from www.the-scientist.com

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