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image: Skin Microbes Help Clear Infection

Skin Microbes Help Clear Infection

By | September 16, 2015

In a small study, researchers find a link between an individual’s skin microbiome and the ability to clear a bacterial infection. 

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image: Traditional Medicine for Leishmaniasis

Traditional Medicine for Leishmaniasis

By | September 14, 2015

A plant used in traditional Mayan remedies to cure the parasitic infection produces a potent compound.


image: Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

By | September 14, 2015

From the same Siberian permafrost where three others were previously discovered, scientists find a fourth type of giant virus.


image: Identity-Shifting Brain Cells

Identity-Shifting Brain Cells

By | September 10, 2015

Cortical interneurons in mice exhibit activity-dependent alterations to their characteristic firing patterns.


image: Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

By | September 9, 2015

A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 

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image: Telltale Mouth Microbes

Telltale Mouth Microbes

By | September 9, 2015

The composition of the plaque microbiome can reveal a child’s risk of dental caries months before the decay appears, according to a study.

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image: Hearing Channel Components Mapped

Hearing Channel Components Mapped

By | September 4, 2015

Localization of two proteins important for inner ear hair cell function suggests they are part of the elusive mechanotransduction channel. 


image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.


image: Mapping Corti

Mapping Corti

By | September 3, 2015

The inner ear organ, from macro to micro


image: Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

By | September 2, 2015

Leptin, the satiety hormone produced by fat, affects neuronal signaling in the mouse brain; interference with this pathway can influence the rewarding effects of running in the animals.


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