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The Scientist

» microbiology, immunology and neuroscience

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image: Mapping Humans’ Mental GPS

Mapping Humans’ Mental GPS

By | August 5, 2013

Scientists have located a type of brain cell that helps people navigate unfamiliar territory.

1 Comment

image: Remodeling Myelin

Remodeling Myelin

By | August 1, 2013

New oligodendrocytes in the adult mouse brain appear to remodel existing myelin sheaths, which may fine-tune the speed of nerve impulses.

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image: Week in Review, July 15–19

Week in Review, July 15–19

By | July 19, 2013

Bias in preclinical research; medical marijuana for kids; a swath of microbial genomes; plastic ocean habitats; rethinking scientific evaluation

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image: Microbial Diversity

Microbial Diversity

By | July 14, 2013

By sequencing bacterial and archaeal genomes from single cells, scientists have filled in many uncharted branches of the tree of life.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Gut Microbes for Life

Gut Microbes for Life

By | July 4, 2013

Most strains of gut microbes stay with us for decades, which may prove useful for tracking our health.

6 Comments

image: Foot Fungus Revealed

Foot Fungus Revealed

By | July 2, 2013

A new study profiles the garden of fungal organism that grows on human feet.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

0 Comments

image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

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