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PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» microbiology and immunology

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image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

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image: Patchy Plankton

Patchy Plankton

By | December 1, 2013

Turbulence interacts with the stabilizing efforts of motile phytoplankton to create small-scale patches of toxic, bloom-forming organisms.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

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image: Tracking Fecal Transplants

Tracking Fecal Transplants

By | November 26, 2013

A long-term study confirms transplants of stool microbes from healthy donors can successfully clear recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.

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image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.

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image: Antifungal Permits Flu?

Antifungal Permits Flu?

By | November 21, 2013

A common fungus-fighting drug increases the susceptibility of mice to influenza infections.

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

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