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image: Reactions to Proposed EPA, NIH Budget Cuts

Reactions to Proposed EPA, NIH Budget Cuts

By | March 3, 2017

Experts discuss how Trump’s budget proposals could affect federally employed and federally funded scientists.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Trump’s Budget May Cut Science Funding

Trump’s Budget May Cut Science Funding

By | February 28, 2017

The president’s 2018 budget request tips the scales in favor of military spending and away from civilian funding agencies, such as the NIH and NSF.

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Seventeen scientists found to have committed research misconduct during the last 25 years have since collectively received more than $101 million in NIH funding.

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image: Publication Ban Affects Former Collaborators

Publication Ban Affects Former Collaborators

By | February 23, 2017

When the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders fired neurologist Allen Braun, the agency also barred his colleagues from publishing data collected over a 25-year period.

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image: Tom Price Confirmed as HHS Director

Tom Price Confirmed as HHS Director

By | February 10, 2017

The orthopedic surgeon is confirmed to lead the US Department of Health and Human Services.

2 Comments

image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

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