The Scientist

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image: Obama Unveils Brain Project

Obama Unveils Brain Project

By | April 3, 2013

Starting in 2014, the federally funded initiative will seek to develop new technologies capable of mapping the activity in the human brain.

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image: NIH Warned About Lobbying

NIH Warned About Lobbying

By | April 1, 2013

A congressman raises concerns that some grants may violate restrictions on federal spending for lobbying.  

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Great Ape Research Decision

Great Ape Research Decision

By | March 12, 2013

The NIH will decide what to do with its research chimpanzees by the end of this month.

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image: NIH Funding Spat

NIH Funding Spat

By | March 7, 2013

A Republican representative objects to a study he said is politically partisan.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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