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image: NIH Leaders Appeal to Congress for Funding

NIH Leaders Appeal to Congress for Funding

By | May 18, 2017

Directors of several institutes testified against proposed 2018 budget cuts.    

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image: Life Science Leaders Meet at White House

Life Science Leaders Meet at White House

By | May 8, 2017

Heads of academia and industry mingled with the vice president and the secretary of Health and Human Services at a biotech summit.

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Animal experiments published in a handful of cardiovascular journals mostly ignore NIH guidelines.

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A point system seeks to ensure that funding is spread more evenly among researchers, especially early- and mid-career scientists.

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image: Congress Agrees to Give NIH $2 Billion Extra

Congress Agrees to Give NIH $2 Billion Extra

By | May 1, 2017

The proposed spending plan for 2017 includes money for Alzheimer’s and cancer research.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: PubMed-Indexed Abstracts to Include COI Statements

PubMed-Indexed Abstracts to Include COI Statements

By | April 19, 2017

Expressions of concern will also be linked in study summaries. 

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