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» NIH and evolution

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image: Finding the Way

Finding the Way

By | August 1, 2013

A focus on the movements of species and disciplines through space, time, and minds

1 Comment

image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.

3 Comments

image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: A Diverse Perspective

Opinion: A Diverse Perspective

By | July 29, 2013

Progress in science is dependent on the diversity of its workforce.

3 Comments

image: How the NIH Fuels Private Business

How the NIH Fuels Private Business

By | July 25, 2013

A new report details the ways in which the federal science agency boost the US economy by stimulating the private sector.

0 Comments

image: Stricter Stem Cell Guidelines Sought

Stricter Stem Cell Guidelines Sought

By | July 25, 2013

A new working group is seeking to define rigorous standards for the study of mesenchymal stem cells.

10 Comments

image: Keeping Up with Climate Change

Keeping Up with Climate Change

By | July 24, 2013

In order to adapt to this century’s changing temperatures, vertebrates will need to evolve much faster than in previous eras.

3 Comments

image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

1 Comment

image: Good Budget News for Govt. Science

Good Budget News for Govt. Science

By | July 11, 2013

Congress subcommittees have proposed increased funding for NIH and NSF.

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

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