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image: Biomedical Researchers Rally for Funds

Biomedical Researchers Rally for Funds

By | April 10, 2013

Crowds flooded into a Washington, DC, park to protest NIH budget cuts and rally for greater investment in potentially life-saving biomedical research. 

4 Comments

image: Is PubMed Hurting Scientific Journals?

Is PubMed Hurting Scientific Journals?

By | April 5, 2013

A study concludes that the open access repository is decreasing biomedical journal readership.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

0 Comments

image: Obama Unveils Brain Project

Obama Unveils Brain Project

By | April 3, 2013

Starting in 2014, the federally funded initiative will seek to develop new technologies capable of mapping the activity in the human brain.

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image: The Falsity of Living Fossils

The Falsity of Living Fossils

By | April 2, 2013

New studies of tadpole shrimp and other organisms show that the term “living fossil” is inaccurate and misleading.

5 Comments

image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.

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image: NIH Warned About Lobbying

NIH Warned About Lobbying

By | April 1, 2013

A congressman raises concerns that some grants may violate restrictions on federal spending for lobbying.  

1 Comment

image:

"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

5 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast

0 Comments

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