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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

By | June 20, 2016

Kids often acquire cavity-causing bacteria from non-family members, researchers report at the American Society for Microbiology annual meeting.

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image: Early-Life Microbiome

Early-Life Microbiome

By | June 16, 2016

Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.

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image: Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

By | June 13, 2016

Autonomic nervous system activity during sleep may help explain variation in the extent to which the behavior aids memory consolidation, a study shows.

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image: Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

By | June 8, 2016

The 700,000-year-old teeth and jawbones of small hominins may be the oldest remnants of Homo floresiensis.

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image: Fish Out of Water

Fish Out of Water

By | June 7, 2016

A researcher documents electric eels jumping out of the water to shock potential threats, confirming a centuries-old anecdotal report of the behavior.

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image: 2016 Kavli Prize Winners

2016 Kavli Prize Winners

By | June 2, 2016

This year’s awards honor discoveries on brain plasticity and the development of atomic force microscopy.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

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image: Meet An Artist With No Hands

Meet An Artist With No Hands

By | June 1, 2016

The brain can compensate for missing body parts, allowing some people, such as Matthias Buchinger, to function at a very high level despite their disabilities.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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