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image: Advantages of Neanderthal DNA in the Human Genome

Advantages of Neanderthal DNA in the Human Genome

By | November 10, 2016

The retention of ancient hominin DNA in modern human genomes may have helped our ancestors adapt to life in diverse environments. 

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Social Media Accelerates Science

Social Media Accelerates Science

By | November 1, 2016

How researchers are taking advantage of Twitter and other forums to do, share, and discuss research

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

By | October 25, 2016

Wild capuchin monkeys in Brazil produce sharp stone flakes by accident, causing some researchers to suggest a rethink of the beginnings of human tool use.

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image: Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals

Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals

By | October 20, 2016

Cross-species trysts likely spread human papillomavirus (HPV) to Homo sapiens, according to new research.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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