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» human evolution and microbiology

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image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

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image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

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image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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image: Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

By | December 4, 2013

A 400,000-year-old mitochondrial genome adds new twists to scientists’ picture of early human evolution.

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image: Stinky Cheese

Stinky Cheese

By | December 2, 2013

Researchers collaborate to create fermented food products using microbes harvested from some malodorous parts of the human body.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

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