The Scientist

» human evolution, neuroscience and ecology

Most Recent

image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.


image: Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

By | December 4, 2013

A 400,000-year-old mitochondrial genome adds new twists to scientists’ picture of early human evolution.

1 Comment

image: Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

By | December 4, 2013

The brains of men contain stronger front-to-rear connections while those of women are better connected from left to right.


image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.


image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.


image: Contributors


By | December 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Herring Impaired

Herring Impaired

By | December 1, 2013

Changing ion channel densities allows fish to tune their hearing to male reproductive calls during breeding periods. 


image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?


image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Rethinking the Rise of Mammals
    Daily News Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

    Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

  2. Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity
  3. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

  4. Battling the Bulge
    Bio Business Battling the Bulge

    Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

Life Technologies