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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Genomes Point the Way

Genomes Point the Way

By | May 28, 2015

Sequence analysis of Egyptian, Ethiopian, and non-African peoples indicates a likely route taken by modern humans migrating out of Africa.

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image: A New Human Ancestor?

A New Human Ancestor?

By | May 28, 2015

Researchers in Ethiopia unearth a previously unknown species of hominin, which roamed Africa at the same time as “Lucy.”

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image: Lost Y Chromosome Genes Found on Autosomes

Lost Y Chromosome Genes Found on Autosomes

By | May 27, 2015

Mammalian Y chromosome genes with important functions are transferred to autosomal chromosomes more often than previously thought, a study shows.

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image: Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

By | May 26, 2015

Researchers unearth 3.3 million-year-old stone flakes in Kenya, forcing a reimagining of the emergence of such technologies in the ancestors of humans.

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image: Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

By | May 11, 2015

Researchers find evidence that measles vaccines reduced deaths from other infectious diseases due to “immune amnesia.”

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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