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» human evolution and immunology

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image: Inner Neanderthal

Inner Neanderthal

By | January 30, 2014

Two studies demonstrate the extent of Neanderthal DNA that persists in modern human genomes.

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image: More than Calcium

More than Calcium

By | January 22, 2014

Ancient DNA analysis suggests that calcium and vitamin D deficiencies were not the only reasons that may have driven Neolithic Iberian people to drink milk.

4 Comments

image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

3 Comments

image: Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

By | December 16, 2013

Dust-borne bacteria from houses with dogs can prevent allergies in mice by changing their gut microbes.

2 Comments

image: Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

By | December 16, 2013

Mouse colon cancer cells can fuse with macrophages, leading to changes in tumor growth.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

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image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

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image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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