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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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image: New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | July 6, 2016

The ancient human may have lived around 900,000 years ago—much more recently than first estimated.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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image: Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

By | June 8, 2016

The 700,000-year-old teeth and jawbones of small hominins may be the oldest remnants of Homo floresiensis.

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.

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