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image: “Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment

“Out of Africa” Theory Gets the Genomic Treatment

By | September 26, 2016

A trio of genetic studies on seldom-studied indigenous populations points to a single wave of migration as humanity wandered from its evolutionary homeland into the rest of the world.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Ancestries of nearly two dozen indigenous groups in the region reveal a close link between the genetic clustering of populations and the Kalahari Desert’s ecogeography.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: TS Picks: August 9, 2016

TS Picks: August 9, 2016

By | August 9, 2016

Gene therapy money-back guarantee; the brain benefits from bilingualism; Q&A with a science watchdog

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image: How Your Nose Got Its Shape

How Your Nose Got Its Shape

By | August 1, 2016

Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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image: On Becoming Human

On Becoming Human

By | August 1, 2016

Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos

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image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

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