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» human evolution and developmental biology

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image: The Neanderthal in the Mirror

The Neanderthal in the Mirror

By | August 1, 2016

Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

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image: Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Fast-evolving regions of the human genome differentiate our species from all other mammals.

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image: Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Do the portions of our genomes that set us apart from other animals hold the secret to human evolution?

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image: Humans Never Stopped Evolving

Humans Never Stopped Evolving

By | August 1, 2016

The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Orangutan Imitates Human Speech

Orangutan Imitates Human Speech

By | July 27, 2016

Captive ape produces more than 500 vowel-like sounds, offering clues to how speech evolved in humans.

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image: New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | July 6, 2016

The ancient human may have lived around 900,000 years ago—much more recently than first estimated.

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

By | June 8, 2016

The 700,000-year-old teeth and jawbones of small hominins may be the oldest remnants of Homo floresiensis.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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