The Scientist

» human evolution and developmental biology

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Contributors

By | August 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Orangutan Imitates Human Speech

Orangutan Imitates Human Speech

By | July 27, 2016

Captive ape produces more than 500 vowel-like sounds, offering clues to how speech evolved in humans.

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image: New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | July 6, 2016

The ancient human may have lived around 900,000 years ago—much more recently than first estimated.

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

Oldest-Known “Hobbit”-like Fossils Found

By | June 8, 2016

The 700,000-year-old teeth and jawbones of small hominins may be the oldest remnants of Homo floresiensis.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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