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» human evolution and developmental biology

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: Snakes on a Visual Plane

Snakes on a Visual Plane

By | October 28, 2013

Researchers detect neurons in the macaque brain that selectively respond to images of reptilian predators.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Ancient Georgian Ancestors

Ancient Georgian Ancestors

By | October 17, 2013

A hominin skull found in Dmanisi reveals that human ancestors migrating from Africa were more primitive than once thought.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Evolution and Medicine</em>

Book Excerpt from Evolution and Medicine

By | October 1, 2013

In Chapter 11, “Man-made diseases,” author Robert Perlman describes how socioeconomic health disparities arise in hierarchical societies.

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image: A Hole in the Head

A Hole in the Head

By | September 30, 2013

Scientists show that the position of the foramen magnum, the hole in the skull through which the spine connects to the brain, is correlated with locomotion and posture in mammals.

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image: Putting the Men in Menopause

Putting the Men in Menopause

By | September 1, 2013

Can mating behavior explain the evolution of menopause in humans?

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image: Why Women Lose Fertility

Why Women Lose Fertility

By | September 1, 2013

Mating behavior is an unlikely driver of women's reproductive aging.

5 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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