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» human evolution and developmental biology

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image: Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

By | March 14, 2016

Nuclear DNA from 430,000-year-old specimens indicates that Neanderthals had already diverged from their ancient-human predecessors.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

By | February 11, 2016

Ancient DNA in the genomes of modern humans influences a range of physiological traits.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Mining the Mite-ochondrial Genome

Mining the Mite-ochondrial Genome

By | December 14, 2015

Phylogenetic analysis of DNA isolated from human hair follicle–dwelling mites shows that different lineages of the arthropods are associated with hosts with different regional ancestries.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Real Planet of the Apes</em>

Book Excerpt from The Real Planet of the Apes

By | December 1, 2015

In Chapter 7, “West Side Story: The African Apes of Europe,” author David Begun describes the thrill of excavating ancient European primates.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Out of Europe?

Out of Europe?

By | December 1, 2015

Instead of getting its start in Africa, humanity may have had more Continental roots. 

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