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image: Diversity in Mexico

Diversity in Mexico

By | June 16, 2014

A genomic survey of Mexicans reveals a wealth of diversity in North America’s southernmost land.

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

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image: Brains vs. Biceps?

Brains vs. Biceps?

By | May 29, 2014

Early humans may have made an evolutionary tradeoff, giving up muscular strength to fuel bigger brains.

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image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: Week in Review: May 12–16

Week in Review: May 12–16

By | May 16, 2014

Antidepressant could prevent Alzheimer’s plaques; 12,000-year-old human skeleton sequenced; disentangling the mystery of octopus arms; taking a look at the ocular microbiome

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image: Ancient Skeleton Sheds Light on Native American Roots

Ancient Skeleton Sheds Light on Native American Roots

By | May 15, 2014

Analysis of approximately 12,000-year-old human remains supports the idea that modern Native Americans evolved from ancestors who migrated out of Asia.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

1 Comment

image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

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