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PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» human evolution and ecology

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Drunk Monkeys

Drunk Monkeys

By | March 1, 2015

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Women After All</em>

Book Excerpt from Women After All

By | February 2, 2015

In the introduction to his latest book, author Melvin Konner explains why he considers maleness a departure from normal physiology.

6 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: It’s Over, Man

It’s Over, Man

By | February 1, 2015

The era of human male domination is ending. Will modern culture welcome the dawn of a new gender equality?

7 Comments

image: Fossil Traces Human Migration Out of Africa

Fossil Traces Human Migration Out of Africa

By | January 28, 2015

Scientists uncover early evidence of modern man’s movements from Africa into Europe—and of potential human-Neanderthal interbreeding.

1 Comment

image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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