The Scientist

» human evolution and ecology

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Mining the Mite-ochondrial Genome

Mining the Mite-ochondrial Genome

By | December 14, 2015

Phylogenetic analysis of DNA isolated from human hair follicle–dwelling mites shows that different lineages of the arthropods are associated with hosts with different regional ancestries.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Real Planet of the Apes</em>

Book Excerpt from The Real Planet of the Apes

By | December 1, 2015

In Chapter 7, “West Side Story: The African Apes of Europe,” author David Begun describes the thrill of excavating ancient European primates.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Out of Europe?

Out of Europe?

By | December 1, 2015

Instead of getting its start in Africa, humanity may have had more Continental roots. 

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