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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Let’s Talk Human Engineering

Let’s Talk Human Engineering

By | December 3, 2015

Experts continue to discuss the logistics and ethical considerations of editing human genomes at a historic meeting in Washington, DC. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Real Planet of the Apes</em>

Book Excerpt from The Real Planet of the Apes

By | December 1, 2015

In Chapter 7, “West Side Story: The African Apes of Europe,” author David Begun describes the thrill of excavating ancient European primates.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

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image: Out of Europe?

Out of Europe?

By | December 1, 2015

Instead of getting its start in Africa, humanity may have had more Continental roots. 

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image: Sneeze O'Clock

Sneeze O'Clock

By | December 1, 2015

Is a nasal circadian clock to blame for allergy symptoms flaring up in the morning?

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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2015

December 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Unregulation of Biotech Crops

The Unregulation of Biotech Crops

By | November 25, 2015

Genetic engineering—once a trigger for federal oversight—is now ushering some modified crops around scrutiny.

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image: Pumpkins Saved By People?

Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 

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