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image: Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

By | November 19, 2014

The largest study yet of the genetic roots of homosexuality links sexual preference in men to two regions of the genome.

7 Comments

image: Sniff While You Sleep

Sniff While You Sleep

By | November 14, 2014

Smokers light up less after smelling cigarette smoke together with foul odors during sleep, a study shows.

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image: Beat Deaf

Beat Deaf

By | November 11, 2014

Trouble keeping a rhythm may come from a mismatch between perception and action, a study shows.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

2 Comments

image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

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image: Inherited Intelligence

Inherited Intelligence

By | July 10, 2014

Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.

4 Comments

image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

2 Comments

image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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